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VICTIMS OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE

INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE HAS DROPPED SHARPLY OVER THE PAST 20 YEARS

Confirms trends that support the minimalist view on p. 264 in Ch. 9.

This statistical report based on victim disclosures on the Justice Department’s National Crime Victimization Survey indicates that IPV declined during the 1990s and has continued to slowly drift downward since then.

Read the Bureau Of Justice Statistics publication:

http://www.bjs.gov/content/pub/pdf/ipv9310.pdf

THE VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN ACT (VAWA) WAS UNDER FIRE FROM BOTH POLITICAL DIRECTIONS, BUT WAS RENEWED

Exapands the coverage of this law, originally passed in 1994 and re-authorized in 2000, cited on p. 275 in Ch. 9.

Conservative critics had a problem with the law’s extending protection to immigrant, gay, and Naive American women. Liberal critics didn’t like the law’s emphasis on arresting and punishing abusive men. Read about the concerns of both sides in this article and then view a video about how the House of Representatives finally voted to reauthorize the Senate’s version of the 1994 law.

Here is additional coverage of the deliberations in Congress and an analysis of which members of the House of Representatives voted  against the re-authorization bill, and why.

United States House of Representatives Seal

United States House of Representatives Seal (Photo credit: DonkeyHotey)

WHEN A VICTIM OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE GETS AN ORDER OF PROTECTION, SHOULD HER ESTRANGED PARTNER HAVE TO TURN IN HIS GUNS?

Dramatizes the issue of the value of restraining orders, as cited on p. 271 of Ch. 9; also illustrates the issue of victims’ rights gained at the expense of suspects, defendants, and offenders rights, as examined on p. 412 of Ch. 13.

One aspect of the current debate over gun ownership centers on battered women who obtain court orders against their intimate partners: would she be safer if he was compelled to hand over any firearms in his possession? Different states handle this dilemma of  the rights of victims vs. the rights of offenders in different ways, as outlined in this article. Read about some tragic cases and note some important statistics here.

WHEN A VICTIM PRESSES CHARGES AND THE INTIMATE PARTNER IS RELEASED ON BAIL, SHOULD HE HAVE TO WEAR AN ELECTRONIC MONITORING BRACELET?

Illustrates improvements in the way cases are handled, as discussed in Ch. 9; also highlights how a victim’s right to safety can be gained at the expense of suspects, defendants, and offenders rights, as examined on p. 412 of Ch. 13.

In California,  domestic violence defendants out on bail awaiting trial, and convicted persons on bail awaiting sentencing must wear a bracelet. Now Maine is considering similar legislation that would monitor the whereabouts of intimate partners in the name of protecting victims from further assaults. Read about the proposed legislation here.

A NEW NATIONWIDE CAMPAIGN AGAINST DOMESTIC VIOLENCE IS UNDERWAY

Read about the “No More” campaign to raise public consciousness about the plight of battered women and survivors of sexual attacks here.

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